How to steal outfit ideas from your favorite magazines (or celebrities)

By IN Advice, How-To Tuesdays, Personal Style

how to steal outfit ideas (from celebrities and magazines)

How-To Tuesdays: Style advice and answers for working momsAs much fun as it can be to play around with style and come up with outfit ideas that are completely your own, that’s just one path to finding your fabulous.

Another? Style thievery! A particularly rich source of inspiration can be found in magazines, both style and celebrity focused (although there doesn’t seem to be much difference these days).

What you see is the work of stylists, fashion editors and other practitioners of the image-making arts. And it can be yours for the cover price of $4.95.

The trick is in translating this fashion vision into outfits you can actually buy, want to wear and look good on you. Here’s how.

How to steal outfit ideas from magazines and celebrities

  • Find a style sister. This is a two-part exercise: You want to identify a celebrity who shares both your personal sense of style and your body shape.* Now when you flip through the next issue of In Style or Vogue, you can keep an eye out for your fashion role model. If you like what she’s wearing, chances are it’ll work on you as well.
  • Keep it real. The over-the-top fashion spreads are clearly Fantasy Wardrobe territory only, but they’re not the only ensembles that are unrealistic to copy as is. If you know what levels of outfits you normally wear it’s easier to skip the ones that are too dressy (or too casual) for the way you live.
  • Pick and choose. When you see an outfit idea that catches your eye, take a look at the pieces it’s made out of: do you have anything similar you can use to re-create the look? It could even be just a part of the outfit idea you can take—like layering or pattern mixing or color blocking—to add to what you typically wear. This is also a way to translate some of those Fantasy Wardrobe looks into Real Wardrobe outfits.

If you’re lucky, you’ll come across an idea that you can copy head to toe; I’ve even found a few in brand and store ads. (And when you do, save it: that’s one less outfit idea to think of next time.)

Looking at lots of outfit and fashion photos can teach you tricks of proportion, fit and combination, too. Over time, you’ll get a better eye for when loose and sleek work together, or what boot height to wear with cropped pants, or different ways to accessorize with jewelry.

*Don’t know what either of those things are? Then, my friend, you need the Frantic But Fabulous online style workshop: Step 1 is all about identifying your style and Step 2 teaches you how to dress to flatter your shape.

20 Responses to “How to steal outfit ideas from your favorite magazines (or celebrities)”

  1. déjà pseu

    Thanks for the link! I do find that I’m often inspired by how someone has paired patterns, colors or silhouettes, and even if the individual pieces or overall look don’t work for me, I can often find a way to translate into my own style vernacular.

    Reply
  2. Ashley

    This is a great post. :) I do something like this every week in my Edit the Editorial posts. In them, I recreate a look from a magazine with stuff I already have. It’s always so much fun and gets me to be really creative! Especially when the shot I’m “copying” is pretty avant garde.

    xo Ashley
    thetiniestfirecracker.com

    Reply
  3. Lara Takahashi

    I rarely steal looks, but I have done that for photoshoots and theme parties, and my victims were style icons from the 70′s or the 80′s.. possibly I subconsciously still ape them sometimes :D
    Thank you for the tips ^^

    Reply
  4. Rei Fujita

    Great post ! I’m always too lazy to steal outfits always thinking that I can imitate them anyway, like you said fantasy world or they’re too formal. But ill give it a try w/ ur tips !

    Reply

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